Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Is it possible to avoid bad impacts by using good fuel ethanol?
Responsible organisation
2010 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Preface 

Much of the global production of biofuels is considered to be non-sustainable. Brazilian sugarcane ethanol, on the other hand, is normally judged to be “good”. Swedes are anxious only to use fuel ethanol with the best climate characteristics in a life-cycle perspective, and the bulk of ethanol used in Sweden comes from Brazil. The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency has identified some crucial issues which often are left out from discussions. These might be of extra importance for the Swedish ethanol use: - Might Swedish demand for good ethanol indirectly raise the demand for “bad” ethanol, such as US maize ethanol with fossil energy input? Or is it possible to encourage the production of exclusively “good” ethanol by choosing such (certified) ethanol? This depends on how the international market for fuel ethanol works. - To what extent does increased Swedish, or European, demand encourage the long-term supply of ethanol? What supply elasticities are there in Brazil and globally? If increased European use only means that we take hold of a fixed supply, the climate benefit compared to fossil fuels will not occur. The analyses are further complicated by the fact that there might be land-use competition between fuel, feedstuffs and food. When available land becomes more limited, increased production might necessitate breaking new soil, which could lead to emissions of climate-changing gases elsewhere. Consequently it is not only the fuel market itself that needs to be analysed. The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency asked the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden to study these issues in a comprehensive context. Chalmers jointly performed the study with researchers in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Authors are Göran Berndes and David Bryngelsson at Chalmers and Gerd Sparovek at University of Sao Paulo/ESALQ. The authors alone are responsible for the contents of the report, which should not be regarded as necessarily reflecting the views of the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. The contact at the Swedish EPA was Mats Björsell. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket, 2010. , p. 82
Series
Rapport / Naturvårdsverket, ISSN 0282-7298 ; 6331
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:naturvardsverket:diva-9479ISBN: 978-91-620-6331-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:naturvardsverket-9479DiVA, id: diva2:1617846
Available from: 2021-12-08 Created: 2021-12-08 Last updated: 2021-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2592 kB)68 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2592 kBChecksum SHA-512
3466c1e6093f207cfcf75af77303b66d9bffce64f4aeae33ef50ed37d5dcc2cd81eed137b7cf13d644103544dc6e5e17a91a64a9f9b7f8ec502e4272b13678cd
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 68 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 16 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf